The power couple has made 104 paid speeches since the beginning of 2014.

Hillary Rodham Clinton and former president Bill Clinton earned in excess of $25 million for delivering 104 speeches since the beginning of 2014, new financial filings revealed. A few calculations on a Scrooge MacDuck calculator reveal that is a lot of money to backstroke through, or, you know, use in a campaign for the presidency.

The financial revelations came when the Clintons filed required income statements from January 2014 onward with the Federal Election Commission on Friday, and reported by The Washington Post. The disclosure reveals that both Clintons have been working very, very hard on the speech circuit giving 104 paid speeches between them since January 2014. For those without a calculator handy, $25 million for 104 speeches breaks down to an average of over $240,000 per speech. Not all of the Clintons’ speaking fees were reflected in the F.E.C. filing, though. Any lecture fees donated to the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation were not reported as they did not provide Clinton with personal income and, thus, were not required to be disclosed.

While Hillary Clinton has retired from the paid lecture circuit now that she is running for president, Bill Clinton is still putting in the miles, telling NBC News, “I gotta pay our bills.” His hefty fees and busy work schedule can translate into substantial earnings—he took in $500,000 in one day by collecting $250,000 each for lectures at Univision and Apollo Management Holdings.

The filing also revealed that as the Clintons’ political capital and experience grows, so do their speaking fees. During Clinton’s 11 years as a U.S. senator and then as President Obama’s secretary of state, according to The Washington Post, Bill Clinton made $105 million for 540 speeches, for an average of just (or rather “just”) $194,444 per speech. In 2012, Hillary Clinton reported that her husband earned more than $16.3 million for 72 speeches, or an average of over $226,000 per speech. Still, good work if you can get it.

Of course Clinton was not the only presidential hopeful who filed with the F.E.C. on Friday. Republican candidate Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida filed his income statements and revealed much smaller holdings, including the fact that he cashed-out two of his retirement accounts worth between $60,000 and $195,000. Rubio and his wife also hold at least $450,000 in home mortgage debt. Republican candidates Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky sought 45-day extensions.