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Drinking Wine & Alzheimer

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  • Drinking Wine & Alzheimer


    This is good news for all wine lovers all over the world. Researchers at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine just released data confirming that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol can lower the risk of dementia.

    The data came from more than 365,000 in 143 studies conducted since 1977. Wine appeared more advantageous than beer or spirits. Moderate drinkers were 23% less likely to suffer dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and a general decline in thinking skills. Moderate drinking means a maximum of two drinks per day for men and one drink per day for women.

    It is noted that the effects of alcohol were the same in men and women. There is no explanation provided but one idea is that alcohol might improve blood flow in the brain to boost brain metabolism. One more theory is that small amounts of alcohol may make brain cells more fit by slightly "stressing them out" and giving the cells practice at coping later with major stress. It is thought that subjecting brain cells to major levels of stress can eventually cause dementia.

    Summarized from: Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin by Cate Stevenson, BA
    There is now no question that moderate drinking of red wine can really help the body cope up with so many health challenges and stress. No wonder we are seeing so many studies on this topic and we are now inundated with so many red wine based products. I always love to drink red wine.
    I Just Love SmartHealthShop!
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