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Sunburn Protection Factor (SPF)

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  • Sunburn Protection Factor (SPF)

    When it comes to taking care of the skin, the mention of sunscreens and SPF is almost always part of a thread. But what is SPF really?

    SPF is the measure of UV radiation required to produce sunburn on protected skin relative to the amount of radiation (solar energy) required to produce sunburn on unprotected skin. In short, the higher the SPF (Sunburn Protection Factor) the lesser the direct damage.

    The following exposures may result in the same amount of solar energy:
    • one hour at 9:00 a.m.
    • 15 minutes at 1:00 p.m.


    Generally, it takes less time to be exposed to the same amount of solar energy at midday compared to early morning or late evening because the sun is more intense at midday relative to the other times.
    Source
    I live in an Asian country and we hardly get sun burned unless for prolonged exposure to the sun. And when I say prolonged, seriously prolonged like hours on beaches and pools. I found this table stating that getting sunburns are also proportional to your skin type (color).


    Source

    Aside from skin type, factors that should also be considered when exposed to the sun is the amount of sunscreen applied and sunscreen application frequency.

    Prolonged exposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer and melanoma. Although paler skins are more prone to sunburn, both brown and dark skins can also develop skin cancer because the palm and the fingers are more lightly pigmented than other areas of the body.

  • #2
    Although the body needs sun exposure for producing the important D vitamin, it should not be done in between 10 am to 3 pm because this is the time when the sun rays can be doing more damage than benefits to our skin. And considering that we are now undergoing a climate change, the more we should be careful when we are overly exposed to the sun. It is always good to be putting on lotions with added SPF for the skin's protection from the sun's UV radiation. Since I am big fan of brisk walking, I make sure that I do it not later than 9 in the morning where the sun is still kind to the skin.
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    • #3
      When you decide to go out remember it takes about 25 minutes for sunscreen to be absorbed by the skin, so it should be applied at least a half an hour before going out in the sun. Sunscreen should also be the last product applied especially on the face since some sunscreens can break down in the presence of water contained in water-based foundations and moisturizers.

      Also remember to check the weather reports UV Index for that day so you can be properly prepared for strong UV days, or else you will turn into a tomato.

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      • #4
        I could agree that there are certain time in a day that we should not be directly exposing our skin in the sun cause it will be very risky for our skin's health. Always advisable to wear sunscreen lotion specially if you will be more exposed to the sun to protect the skin from too much sun rays. Check those sunscreens that have enough ingredients to protect the skin. And it was so right to put lotion ahead of time before going to be exposed or swim in the beach.
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        • #5
          The burning question: is suncream a scam? - Times Online

          Great article about SPF claims by sunscreen companies.
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          • #6
            When it comes to sunscreen, I always live by the "better safe than sorry" rule. My grandma passed away due to skin cancer, so I am vigilant about applying sunscreen with an SPF of at least 50 on both my son and myself before any type of sun exposure. It is important to remember to allow for sufficient time for the sunscreen to soak in, and to reapply as necessary.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by AmazingP View Post
              Although the body needs sun exposure for producing the important D vitamin, it should not be done in between 10 am to 3 pm because this is the time when the sun rays can be doing more damage than benefits to our skin...Since I am big fan of brisk walking, I make sure that I do it not later than 9 in the morning where the sun is still kind to the skin.
              I tend to get my daily dose of sunlight a little earlier. I do go out by 8 since the sun is exposed enough but it's not too hot and not directly above me. During noon time, I hardly go out of the house because it's really hot and I can really feel the sun on my skin. I'm sure it's already damaging some of my cells inside.

              Originally posted by vartanus View Post
              When you decide to go out remember it takes about 25 minutes for sunscreen to be absorbed by the skin, so it should be applied at least a half an hour before going out in the sun. Sunscreen should also be the last product applied especially on the face since some sunscreens can break down in the presence of water contained in water-based foundations and moisturizers.

              Also remember to check the weather reports UV Index for that day so you can be properly prepared for strong UV days, or else you will turn into a tomato.
              Oh yes, thanks for adding that up. My sister always reminds me to put on sunscreen thirty minutes before or else it's not going to work. Is it really alright to put on moisturizer and sunscreen together? Won't it irritate your skin? But I seriously hate putting on sunscreens because they feel sticky like putting glue all over.

              Originally posted by tttenderoni View Post
              The burning question: is suncream a scam? - Times Online

              Great article about SPF claims by sunscreen companies.
              Thanks for adding this. I read it and got this information aside from the four famous sunscreens that didn't have the same amount of SPF than they claimed to have.

              Until recently it had been assumed that applying half the recommended amount of sun cream meant half the SPF protection. In fact, the protection level falls more steeply, and the higher the SPF, the more rapid the drop that comes with under-application.

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              • #8
                Oh, God. Everytime I see these kinds of posts, I just feel sick. Do you even KNOW how dangerous the chemicals are in sunscreen? Why does no one do their own research and protect themselves? These chemicals may protect you against sunburn.. and in one sense that is protection. But the chemicals themselves cause skin-cancer, and other cancers! Extremely carcinogenic! So you are, in essense, doing your body more harm than good. Buy a natural sunscreen. Take high doses of Vitamin C. Protect yourself the natural, healthy way!

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